choice Magazine

Beyond the Page Podcast ~ AI: The Ultimate Virtual Assistant.

September 05, 2023 Garry Schleifer
choice Magazine
Beyond the Page Podcast ~ AI: The Ultimate Virtual Assistant.
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

In today's episode, we have a captivating conversation with Allison Graham, a keynote speaker, consultant, and author of the article in our latest issue titled "AI: The Ultimate Virtual Assistant." We delve into how technology and AI can become powerful allies for streamlining workflows, especially in professional coaching.

Have you ever felt the weight of repetitive stress in your professional life? This episode could hold the remedy you're seeking. We explore the fine line between automating creativity and its ethical implications, including the use of automated tools for writing and content creation. Along the way, we uncover how AI can support scheduling, data analysis, and personalized coaching sessions. However, the discussion also touches upon the responsibility that comes with harnessing this power.

Allison Graham specializes in assisting accomplished individuals seeking relief from daily stress. She's known for simplifying life, creating systems, and optimizing workflows. Her last book, Take Back Your Weekends: Stress Less, Do More, Be Happier, has been inspiring professionals worldwide, and her upcoming book, The Stress Illusion, challenges conventional stress management.

You may recognize Allison from media outlets such as CTV, CBC, and Breakfast Television,  and now as a contributor to choice Magazine.

Watch the full interview by clicking here

Find the full article here: https://bit.ly/BTP-AllisonGraham

Learn more about Allison here

Allison has a special gift for our listeners. Please click here to find out more

Grab your free issue of choice Magazine here - https://choice-online.com/

Garry Schleifer:

Welcome to the choice Magazine podcast, Beyond the Page Sounds, a little bit like the Twilight Zone, but it's not. choice, the magazine of professional coaching, is your go-to source for expert insights and in-depth features from the world of professional coaching. I'm your host, Garry Schleifer, and I'm thrilled to have you join us today. In each episode, we go beyond the page of articles published in choice Magazine and delve deeper into some of the most recent and relevant topics impacting the world of professional coaching, exploring the content, interviewing the talented minds behind the articles and uncovering the stories that make an impact. choice is more than just a magazine. For over 21 years, we have built a community of like-minded people who create, use and share coaching tools, tips and techniques to add value to their businesses and, of course, more importantly, impact their clients. That's what we want to do. In today's episode, I'm speaking with a keynote speaker, author and consultant, Allison Graham. She's the author of an article on our latest issue "Technology and AI: Will it support or replace human coaching?" Her article is entitled "AI: the ultimate virtual Assistance." I like that A little bit about Allison. She's a keynote speaker, author and consultant who works with highly accomplished men and women who love their work but want more mental and emotional space away from the constant stress of the daily grind. Allison is driven by her belief that people are making life harder than it needs to be. That includes us, as we were talking about and create systems to problem solve, make friends with stress and streamline workflows. In fact, she's on a mission. She'll tell us more about that in a moment. Her latest book, "Take Back Your Weekends: Stress Less, Do More, Be Happier", is giving hope to professionals oh, I'm laughing I'm going to come back to this Across the globe that they can have it all. And her next book, "The Stress Illusion, is set to challenge the status quo on stress management advice. Can't wait. You may recognize her from media outlets like CTV, CBC and Breakfast Television, and now as a contributor to choice Magazine.

Allison Graham:

choice Magazine.

Garry Schleifer:

Yes, exactly, okay, so I had to laugh. Thank you for joining us, Allison. I'm going to jump right in. I had to laugh when I was reading the part about making it harder than it needs to be, because we were talking about it. And it's like we were talking about they make it harder than it needs to be and we were talking about.

Allison Graham:

No, we make it harder. We make it, every one of us taking full responsibility. And I tell you, I use my own advice every day and when I don't, my mother reminds me I need to.

Garry Schleifer:

Oh, okay, good mother, yeah, yeah, she's awesome. Yeah, true, true, so is mine I. So I don't know the answer to this, but our audience doesn't. What had you write this article for us?

Allison Graham:

Well, I'm a tech geek. I love it. I will geek out on tech and it's like my guilty little pleasure is building out a CRM system. Good lord you know you can get this, not necessarily my joy, but building it is like bringing it on, and it actually was. Probably, I'm going to say I started to get really into tech about 2012, behind the scenes, and the reason was I would get so frustrated because I would have a change I wanted to make on the website and then I would have to send it to my designer and wait for them to get it into the queue, and a week later I'd want a different change. And so, for the coaches who are familiar with the Colby Index, do you know that one no, okay, so it's one of the personality, right?

Garry Schleifer:

yeah.

Allison Graham:

I am a 10 on the quick start scale.

Garry Schleifer:

That means.

Allison Graham:

That basically means I'm going to jump in with all feet. I have an idea. I want to make it happen now, and waiting on people to figure out tech was not my way to be involved. Oh, so I just learned it.

Garry Schleifer:

I remember those days yeah, oh my gosh yeah. That sounds so familiar.

Allison Graham:

It is right. It's just like we wait for so many other people, and it's all about what are those repeating moments of angst?

Garry Schleifer:

And I want to pick up on that. You used that word. You used very Irritations, angst, friction in your article. I really love that because it really resonated for me, because you speak about using AI to be supportive, which I really love, because everyone else pretty much everyone else in the issue were talking about the generative AI and you're talking about the rather mundane, if you will, but super useful AI. So tell us a bit more about how you feel about that.

Allison Graham:

Well, I think that we need to. We can be our own selves, our brilliant selves, every person showing up Like I don't think AI is going to replace you I mean, maybe one day it will but I think that there's an essence that only you can bring your soul, how you're showing up.

Garry Schleifer:

That was the other word essence.

Allison Graham:

Your essence, yes, and if we can use the technology around us in order to streamline that process so that you can do more of what your talent is serving your clients and being hyperproductive without having been. The angst is one of my favorite words is like why? Like even invoicing, Right? Right, If you're not using a system that is easily doing your invoicing for you and processing your payments and following up if they're not, well then that's just something that's going to be lingering in the back of your mind. Oh gosh, I've got to do that Right. And so I'm all about finding those repeating moments of angst. What is it that's? And every one of us, in our own mind, we can find that we know what the thing is that's driving us just to the edge. And let's look at it objectively and then find a solution and eliminate that angst from our life.

Garry Schleifer:

I had flashbacks when I was rereading this article, about when I was thinking exactly about that. What were? I wanted more time to coach and I didn't wanna do the mundane tasks, and so I went about finding a virtual assistant. Remember those back in the day. They still exist. And the most important thing I learned from those conversations was what is it you do over and over again, routinely, and so can we, and I, known as the freedom guru. So you know you're about de-stress, I'm freedom, but we're on the same track.

Allison Graham:

We're on the same page I like freedom, weekends go.

Garry Schleifer:

But I always say automate, eliminate or delegate. In fact, a friend of mine sings it to me all the time Automate, eliminate, delegate. So can you, can you, first of all? Brilliant. Can you eliminate it? Great. Then get rid of it. Can you delegate it? Great, that's still off your plate. Or can you automate it, and so? But over to you. What you're talking about are all these fabulous tools that will take away some of the mundane work, that will allow us to coach, and it's been doing it for years. Everybody's like all up in arms now about, oh, AI, is this new thing? No, it's not. Like a friend of mine from the University of Calgary, professor of computer science, said oh please, I was late 70s, that's when that started.

Allison Graham:

Okay so it's true, and it's often the mundane stuff that will drag us down. I mean, obviously right, it takes us out of our what I call the sweet spot of performance, productivity, profitability and personal fulfillment, and that beautiful intersection is where we wanna spend as much as our time is possible.

Garry Schleifer:

Say it again, say it again.

Allison Graham:

Okay, sweet spot of performance, Right, Productivity, profitability and personal fulfillment oh.

Garry Schleifer:

I can really get on board for the four piece.

Allison Graham:

Isn't that beautiful.

Garry Schleifer:

I think there's another article, Allison.

Allison Graham:

Oh, bring it on. I've got articles. We only have how much time on here, yeah.

Garry Schleifer:

I know, that's why you have to write more, right, no, I totally will, and so finding that is different for every person.

Allison Graham:

And it's interesting that you bring up delegation and deletion, because a lot of time when we talk about stress and we talk about you know, a lot of the expert opinions are just delete and delegate. But at the end of the day, you can only delete and delegate so many things in your life and if your pattern is to create destructive stress that causes the overwhelm and the anxiety and takes you out of that sweet spot of the four piece, then you're going to do that with whatever is left over. Right and so. But if there are things that you are not delegating or you are saying yes to because you don't have the boundaries and you need to get it out of your existence, then let's deal with that and be strategic and objective about how we do that. And then that automation piece you're right, this has been around for a very long time, oh yeah, and it doesn't mean people are leveraging it.

Garry Schleifer:

No, I know, even now. So all this fear about AI taking over in a supportive role, we still have to choose it. And what I love about your article is that you were very clear about not avoiding overwhelm. Don't pick the latest shiny object. I like to say, don't try to hit a thumbtack with a sledgehammer. Like, note your process. I was instructed to write down my. I'm kind of did that way, geeky with, or I'm a systems guy, so you're techie, I'm systems. So I write out everything step by step. I give it to my team and they automate it. Or they. Well, first of all, they ask me, why are you doing that? And then I just have to admit why I'm doing it and half the time I don't really need to do it. But anyway, for those of you listening, that's my story and you can talk to me personally about that. But thank you so much for pointing that out. And you want to say any more about the prep of using AI?

Allison Graham:

Well, I think there's an ethical dilemma with this. Shall we go into that?

Garry Schleifer:

I would love to hear how it's ethically impactful.

Allison Graham:

OK so I have two colleagues who are coaches, consultants, whatever we're going to call us all of us thought leaders and supporters of other human beings, and two of them are using Chat GPT to write books. And so the way this works is hey, I want to write a book on this topic. What should my title? What should my chapters be? Great, what are key points in chapter one? What are key points in chapter two, and so on? Great. Write me a 1500 word chapter on chapter one in this voice, and that, to me, is a very reasonable use of Chat GPT for ChatGPT's book, not for author X's book. And I assure you the intention is not to give credit where credit is due. They are writing a book and going to put their name on it based on a bot writing it, and to me there are some people who think that that's totally cool and perfectly normal and etc. And for me I'm like, if you're going to put down co-authored by, prompted by author X and authored by right, you know ChatChat as I call it ChatGPT, is my nickname and I will actually say ChatChat I think you're off the rails today. Do better. We have a conversation. To me, that's an ethical dilemma there is how does somebody who's written a book and called themselves now an author that is probably quite well written and saves a whole bunch of stuff, doing it that way? How do they step onto a stage with Q&A when there are 500 people in the audience? Where's the depth of expertise Whatever company actually brings them in, expecting that they know everything that was in there, and all they know is how to read the ChatChat made for them, and so to me, that's a bit of an ethical dilemma. The same thing is happening with content, right, if you put content out on social media and none of it is your original thought, then you're not really putting out content, you're regurgitating other content, and I know in our industry there's a lot of people who just take other people's ideas or who and then repurpose it as their own, like, legitimately, like. There's one advertisement that goes around and I don't know who of the four people who use the exact same ad and writing actually created it. Who was first? Yeah, I know it's successful because they're all running essentially and it's around burnout and how do you do it? And I've gone to their websites and I think I know who started with it, because she has such a depth of knowledge and the others don't have as much. Copyrights. Yeah, right, so you have to make a decision for yourself. Does that work for you? And because I love, love, love writing content and creating and observing the human experience and creating my own frameworks. Like my brain doesn't stop doing that, it's just how I show up in the world, and so, for me, my models need to be my models.

Garry Schleifer:

Right? Well, because you, but you have the depth of knowledge.

Allison Graham:

Garry Schleifer:

Chat wouldn't be an issue, because you're still monitoring the content. It's. It's getting you started. Like you said in the article, for those that have writer's blog or things like that, you still know whether it's truthful or not and whether it's actually in your own voice.

Allison Graham:

Yes, and this is where we use it as a supportive tool. Right, here are the 10 points and I think with the article I wrote out like here are some of the things you could do, and then I put those into chat, chat and said what would I miss? And it gave me one that I went backwards, I forget.

Garry Schleifer:

Yeah, I've got it right here. The ones that overlap with what you thought you had your own thoughts. And you said, okay, tell me what you, what's what I might be missing, but you didn't tell it what you thought and you analyze that separately.

Allison Graham:

Yeah.

Garry Schleifer:

Brilliant. And that we're doing that now. The other day I did a survey for writers that are written for us multiple times. We wanted to get some feedback and I was like, well, questions Do I ask? So we literally just put it in there, Give me up to 10 questions that I should ask. But it gave us, like it gave us, the starting block and then it was like, well, no, that doesn't, that's not really what I want to say, but that's a good start. And then I and we were done in no time. Performance no, what was your P? Productivity?

Allison Graham:

Performance, productivity, profitability. I love, professional fulfillment.

Garry Schleifer:

So we got a hammer. We were hitting the sweet spot of getting the job done. The personal satisfaction was that it got done so fast and it didn't drag out. It was like a story of your website change Right. It's like oh, I'd send it to my team. My team is in a bag, I want to do it now. I'm like you know that's the other thing. That that we have been trained to do, too, is instant gratification. So we're, we're talking about, but I have a question about one of them. Okay, so I'm going to read all of them because I think it's valuable and it's so true. Those of you are scared of AI being supportive tool. It's already doing these things for most of us Automated scheduling and reminders, data analysis, chatbots, personality assessments, goal setting and accountability. They're all kind of being done Like you'd go do a Myers-Briggs online and get your report. It's like like that's, that's AI. The one I have a question about is what do you mean by personalization of coaching sessions?

Allison Graham:

Oh, there are tons of tools now that are out there, that, and I haven't been using these because, again, this is not a moment of angst for me, so I don't. I don't need a bot to interpret my clients mood.

Garry Schleifer:

Oh, is that what we're talking about, Like?

Allison Graham:

okay.

Garry Schleifer:

When you further said about using voice analysis tools to analyze the tone and emotional content of a client's voice.

Allison Graham:

Right, even like note taking, right. What are the minutes that come from this?

Garry Schleifer:

Hello, transcribe it while it's going.

Allison Graham:

Right, and then here are the highlights.

Garry Schleifer:

Yeah.

Allison Graham:

And so I record most of my calls and I can put them up into Otter AI Right and it will not only give me the transcript, which I will probably never read, but it'll give me the summary key point. And I know other people who are using fathom or phantom phathom. I just know F A T H O M. And it basically goes into your Zoom with you and it'll take notes and it'll spit out incredible notes like legitimate notes better than not to rate a dot AI, wow. And so you can give that to your, your clients, to just go like here you go, and then you're not doing it Like I used to do summaries after coaching calls for my clients, oh, yeah, oh no. Why not a good use of my time?

Garry Schleifer:

Well, and why you're doing the work for the client.

Allison Graham:

The client, so I'm supposed to be doing the work exactly.

Garry Schleifer:

Exactly, able and empowered.

Allison Graham:

But yet so many people still are. And if you choose to do that, by the way, no judgment. I am as judgment free zone, like do your thing, you do you. I love doing that, because for some people because I've talked to other coaches who love doing the follow up emails right, I'm going to rephrase that I don't think any of them love doing it, but they want to do it because they need to solidify what happened in the meeting so they can set the course of action. Okay, but it's this thing that is like, oh, I got to do the debris from the meeting on Thursday and it's like the Wednesday later, right, and so it's this thing that hangs over. But that's where using an AI tool can completely shift. And, like I was listening to a podcast yesterday, Impact Theory is one of my favorites, other than choice Magazine's podcast. Well, of course, beyond.

Garry Schleifer:

The page is number one and you're only.

Allison Graham:

That's right, Tom Billew have you ever watched his work? Okay, he is incredible. Tom and Lisa Billew, they are thought leaders and they have tons of interviews. But he does a lot of work around AI and actually it was listening to one of his podcasts very early in the process that inspired my depth of going down that rabbit hole, and I was listening to a new one just yesterday and he was saying, like you could literally have an AI bot right now, assess all of your work and answer questions on your behalf in the way that you would answer them. You can have an e-book, have your book read in your voice.

Garry Schleifer:

Oh, okay, that's good. You know how hard it is to record an audiobook. I could not. No, I've not.

Allison Graham:

Yes, it's very painstaking, which is why you may notice, out of five books that I've written, I have no audiobooks.

Garry Schleifer:

Ha ha ha, ha, ha, ha ha. Well, now you can.

Allison Graham:

Now I can and then I'd have to be like I hear you have angst about that.

Garry Schleifer:

Maybe you should look at AI.

Allison Graham:

Right, so I, because it is. It's a thing right, managing your voice for that long and being through it and actually just reading what you wrote, as opposed to adding in and ad-libbing another story. I apparently that is harder to do than I thought it was.

Garry Schleifer:

I have a script here for my podcast and every time I have to change something on the fly.

Allison Graham:

It's just, it's how we fly right. So, but if I did that, I would actually put in the introduction or whatever transcribed, or you know, audiobook bye cha cha or whoever the technology is. But it's all there, but it's still. It's like where are the moments that you need reprieve, where's the grind getting to you and how do we find the right tool for it? Yeah, exactly.

Garry Schleifer:

And it's always been that way. It's always been that way. It's about stopping and noticing the angst, though Most people just motor through and go. I have to, I have to, I have to, and they never. I don't have enough time to stop and look around.

Allison Graham:

Right? Well, you need to invest time today to buy back time tomorrow.

Garry Schleifer:

Oh, love that.

Allison Graham:

It's one of the chapters in my book "Take Back Your Weekends. It's we need to be strategic. Look at your week as if it were a movie. Like literally just look and pretend you got some popcorn, throw a little caramel sauce on there, if that flinched your back. And sit back and watch your week happen and you can see where are the moments where I'm complaining. So the idea around note taking you know my colleagues who still are taking notes and building notes for themselves Right, well, that's okay, but you're complaining about it, so it's not okay. Like you can complain all you want, but why would you keep complaining two years later when there's technology that can fill in that blank for you and you don't have to. You can still achieve the outcome without that repeating frustration.

Garry Schleifer:

Yeah, exactly, and I have to apologize because I'm still stuck in judgment.

Allison Graham:

Are you? Oh yeah.

Garry Schleifer:

Because what I've learned over time is that it's the client. If the client wants to remember something, they need to write their own notes, which keep and if I'm writing notes, that keeps me from being present 100% to my client.

Allison Graham:

Okay, and as far as I can, let's do a word through the judgment of that and thanks, Coach Allison we don't have to, we can do that offline. We can do that offline, yes, no, and you know what?

Garry Schleifer:

And I get it, and it's just a consideration. It's something I'm learning as I'm educating towards applying for my MCC Master Certified Coach. Yeah, and is. If I'm writing notes, I can't be present. Whatever you're doing other than being with the client is not being present, and so I, which is interesting because I'm more present when I'm jotting notes. Really.

Allison Graham:

Yeah, because what I'm doing is I'm listening and I'm pulling the key point, and it also allows me and this is just everybody's style and also with my problem solving why I don't believe the same solution works for every person and a blanket statement. But for me I need to. If I don't write down the thing that they say that I believe is really important, I will interrupt them so that we can go down that path and we know, as a coach, you can't do that. That's not going to be helpful. I already know the path they need to go down, but then in a little bit I'm probably going to circle back around to that, and so for me and, by the way, my notes For those who can get on the screen first- of all, they all.

Garry Schleifer:

Oh, I thought mine were bad. Oh, my God, okay.

Allison Graham:

So nobody's going to read them and they're not like heros of any sort, but it's little drops so that I can come back to it, and if we're, because I live so much in the present, at least I. That's my goal, and so I've just recognized a little quirk of mine is that if I don't capture it, I'm trying to do double time. I'm trying to get my memory to activate when I'm trying to listen, and the two can't activate at the same time for me.

Garry Schleifer:

Okay, so what if you just listened?

Allison Graham:

Because then I might miss the memory piece of where they were, but it doesn't matter where they were. It does, it's where they.

Garry Schleifer:

Oh, who's the call about?

Allison Graham:

Nobody. I want to serve them in the best way.

Garry Schleifer:

I know so.

Allison Graham:

I will bring.

Garry Schleifer:

I love how we have two different schools of thought of this and we can still both have our way. I love it.

Allison Graham:

Absolutely, and this is the thing. This is why you don't have judgment. Yeah, I mean ethically. I think there's an issue with people passing off somebody else's work as their own. You do have judgment around that, and I think there's a way you can do it in an ethical way. Yeah, right, so that's the thing, but in terms of coaching style. So what'll happen is all scan those scribbles and three months from now, when I notice a pattern with a client because I can go back, well, I'll go back and go. Let me just check something for a second and I'll look back and go oh, wait a second. In June, they said that phrase back then. That's how, and there's no way I'm going to remember that.

Garry Schleifer:

And in AI, taking notes on the call, can do that for you. A friend, Jonathan Wright, who I interviewed for the AI issue as well, was telling me about one of them and it notices patterns and lets you know what the patterns are, and I can't wait. That's one I really want to use because it also takes a look at, because you wonder about your questions. So, yes, you're transcribing questions, but it will analyze how many were open-ended and how many weren't, how many, how stacked they were, how often you spoke versus the client spoke. So it's like a dashboard, that kind of oh, and then you can decide what do you want to work on?

Allison Graham:

Right and everybody would. Even. So we go down that route at all. Some people would be like I don't need that many open-ended questions. I mean, obviously we want open-ended questions, right. But there are times and that's why I call myself a consultant and a coach because I mirror both. I am often brought in because people are suffocating on the daily grind and so they want solutions. So I will work with them on understanding what their beautiful flow is and then helping them, and I have such a geeked out toolbox.

Garry Schleifer:

Of course, yeah, yeah, that I put it in.

Allison Graham:

So I see myself as bordering on both of those. I'm not a true, true, true coach who's only asking the questions and helping them guide.

Garry Schleifer:

And you can analyze the way you want it to analyze, because you have control over the addict. That's the big thing that I think that people don't get. They've been so, I guess, mesmerized with these sci-fi movies that the machine is going to stink for itself without any human input, and I think we're still at a stage right now where it requires some human input.

Allison Graham:

You still get to choose.

Garry Schleifer:

Right.

Allison Graham:

Three months from now. It won't Probably not In areas, so in areas, but for you to show up and be in your true essence, you still need that, and so there's a quote that's really bopping around the internet AI will not replace your job. People who are leveraging AI will replace your job. And I challenge that a little bit. I think AI actually for some people will replace their job.

Garry Schleifer:

Oh, definitely. We're already seeing it in image creators, content creators, that sort of thing. There's still the ethics question. Don't get me wrong, but it doesn't mean that that's not going to have an impact.

Allison Graham:

Well and. But here's the thing are you really a content creator if you're just using AI to pull content? Like you know when we were in university or in college or even high school, and I don't know if they care in public school if you plagiarized, but I know as an adult you weren't allowed to do that and so why is that okay, like if you?

Garry Schleifer:

Because I did, I played with ChatC hat, yeah, right.

Allison Graham:

And I got into an AI model, right, yeah, and it's like 90% of this is plagiarized, right, like, or, you know, is bought like, like. There are ways to check this kind of thing.

Garry Schleifer:

Well, exactly, there should be an AI that will check whether an AI something is AI generated.

Allison Graham:

They totally are. There are tons of them.

Garry Schleifer:

The schools are going to love that because they're worried about essays and whatever written word being generated from a computer. And again back to your point about no thought leadership around it, no ownership of the content and knowledge and the wisdom, like you said about the person going to the stage.

Allison Graham:

Yeah, and don't you think as like the upside of this? Potentially for coaches? There are many, but I think that as machines get smarter which, by the way, I believe is an inevitability, not something we can stop, it just is, although I think Chat, chat got a little bit dumber Just up and down. I think they flipped a switch because, I will often say now, chat, chat. I don't think you're listening to me, like you used to listen to me, and now you're not like you talk, because it'll talk back, right.

Garry Schleifer:

It's actually quite funny. I don't actually use one.

Allison Graham:

Oh, it's so fun.

Garry Schleifer:

Yeah, I would get. I would go on such a rabbit hole.

Allison Graham:

Oh my gosh, if you saw my feed of rabbit holes. Ah, it's so fun, fun, fun. All that to say whatever it was I was focusing on saying I see squirrel, squirrel. But I think that the beautiful part is, as machines fill in the blanks for us, in those moments of angst, there's space that's going to be open, and how we fill that space is where the opportunity is for building a life that you absolutely love Increased emotional connection, increased awareness of yourself, your soul, your going inward, increased opportunity for connection and being present and living in the essence of who you are when you're not caught up in the grind. And so we can use technology to replace some of the grind.

Garry Schleifer:

I'm looking forward to it seriously, I'm embracing it and I think that's what people coaches are listening mostly, but as people, we fear what we don't know about. So, know about it and that's why we did the issue and that's why we're doing the podcast is so that people can listen and make up their own minds how this fits in. But I probably could guarantee that the majority of people listening and reading their fear level is going down, because there's so many different ways you can deal with it that you can use it that you can not use it, and there's still a lot of choice in it. Oh gosh, what a great name for a magazine.

Allison Graham:

It really is a magazine. Do you think people's fear is going down? I think it's increasing.

Garry Schleifer:

No, no, if they get the knowledge, the ones that are reading. We did this issue to reduce the fear, because I believe that knowledge reduces fear.

Allison Graham:

Yes, so that's oh, absolutely I agree.

Garry Schleifer:

Right, oh, yeah, no, yeah, they still. People still have to do their work. So, for those of you that are listening to, or watching and or listening, thank you for being here, because this, that's our hope, is that we'll reduce your angst, reduce your fear about it and look at it, see where it might actually work for you and where you're already using it and you didn't realize it was AI.

Allison Graham:

Great. The one I'm looking forward to coming out is ClickUp 3.0, because it's all AI driven.

Garry Schleifer:

Ok.

Allison Graham:

And it'll be interesting because it could be a game changer for people.

Garry Schleifer:

There's so many things I know Well, and then there's so many things that you just get overwhelmed. So, is it chat, gbt, is it this? What are the you know? Is it the Google version? Is it the Apple version, microsoft version, like, which one is best? Which one do you use? What do I use it for? How do I word it? How do I deal with the output? So I just like I'll interview people, we'll just talk about it.

Allison Graham:

Right, and this is where I bring it back to watch the movie of your week. Find the moments of frustration, find those repeating moments of angst, find the places that are draining your capacity each and every day, and start there and be very, very crystal clear of what you want something to do for you before you choose the technology.

Garry Schleifer:

Very clear. I agree 100%. You just answered our question. What you'd like our audience to do is resolve the article in this conversation there you go. Really. Watch a movie of your life With the popcorn or the chips of your choice. I'll go with ripple all dressed.

Allison Graham:

Ooh, I haven't had all dressed in a long time.

Garry Schleifer:

There's an added crunch to ripple and all dressed takes you away from the boring plainness of ripple.

Allison Graham:

That was very deep.

Garry Schleifer:

Right.

Allison Graham:

What kind of yeah?

Garry Schleifer:

Yeah, ok, bye. No, I was going to go down in chip conversation. I'm like I don't think that's on point. Whirl.

Allison Graham:

As if I'm not going to go get a bag of salt and vinegar today.

Garry Schleifer:

I'm just saying I love salt and vinegar. Oh my gosh, it's like a little dance on your tongue Right. And it's like salt is a vinegar. Thank you so much for joining.

Allison Graham:

No AI can take us in that conversation.

Garry Schleifer:

Exactly, just FYI. How could they be a?

Allison Graham:

producer.

Garry Schleifer:

Exactly Nothing could have taken us there. Allison, thank you so much for joining us for this Beyond the Page episode. What's the best way for people to reach you, find out about the book and that sort of stuff?

Allison Graham:

Yeah, come on over to my website, and I've actually put together a special link for your listeners and readers. So it's allisongrahamcom backslash or is it forward slash, slash, choice, dash mag, that thing.

Garry Schleifer:

OK.

Allison Graham:

That thing, choice dot, dash mag, and so if you go there it's a sign up, you can go on my lift app, but I'm also going to send you a list of technologies that I'm leveraging in my business right now and some other possibilities, and so that's available. And also connect with me on LinkedIn. That's where I play my most.

Garry Schleifer:

Your big game. Lovely been, fabulous, fabulous. Thank you very much. That's it for this episode of Beyond the Page. For more episodes, subscribe to your favorite podcast app or go to our website, choice-online. com. While you're there, if you're not a subscriber, look on the home page and click the sign up now button and get a free copy. I'm Garry Schleifer. Enjoy the journey of mastery.

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