choice Magazine

Beyond the Page Podcast ~ Revolutionizing Coaching: Exploring the RESPECT Framework

November 28, 2023 Garry Schleifer
choice Magazine
Beyond the Page Podcast ~ Revolutionizing Coaching: Exploring the RESPECT Framework
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Get ready to revolutionize your coaching game with David Morelli, PhD and co-founder and CEO of OwlHub. Unlock the power of the RESPECT Coaching Styles Framework — a transformative approach gleaned from David's extensive research and experience. As we explore the seven organizing forces behind this coaching framework, we'll discover the inner workings of each style, and how they can shift the course of the coaching industry.

David brings 25 years of executive coaching and leadership development experience. David is the creator of the RESPECT Coaching StylesTM framework and assessments.
Formerly, David was a business school professor in leadership with an instructor rating of 4.93/5 from executive audiences. David also served as the SVP of Strategy and Talent Development for a tech company, helping them grow 100x in 7 years to a $3.5B valuation. Additionally, David is the host of a #1 podcast, OwlCast with over 1.2 million subscribers. He holds an Executive MBA and PhD in business with research in executive coaching and leadership from the University of Denver.

Further on, our discussion dives into the nitty-gritty of different coaching styles, from the Explorer to the Transformer, and how these can be infused into varying coaching scenarios. We'll also touch on the unique role of a coach and how inspiration from other professions can enrich the coaching approach. Moving on, we'll ponder the impact of coaching styles on both individuals and organizations, revealing how a deeper understanding can significantly enhance your coaching prowess. Embrace this opportunity to level up your coaching skills and make a positive impact on your clients' lives.

Watch the full interview by clicking here

Find the full article here: https://bit.ly/BTP-DM

Learn more about David here.

David's gift to our listeners: Find your Coaching Style here

Grab your free issue of choice Magazine here - https://choice-online.com/
 
In this episode, I talk with David Morelli about his article published in our September 2023 issue.

Garry Schleifer:

Welcome to the choice Magazine podcast, Beyond the Page. choice, the magazine of professional coaching, is your go-to source for expert insights and in-depth features from the world of professional coaching. I'm your host, Garry Schleifer, and I'm thrilled to have you join us today. Seriously, in each episode, we go Beyond the Page, obviously, of articles published in choice Magazine and dive deeper into some of the most recent and relevant topics impacting the world of professional coaching, exploring the content, interviewing the talented minds like one we have here today behind the articles and uncovering the stories that make an impact. choice is more than a magazine. For over 21 years, we've built a community of like-minded people who create, use and share coaching tools, tips and techniques to add value to their business and, of course, what we all want impact our clients. In today's episode, I'm speaking with co-founder and CEO of Owl Hub, David Morelli, who's the author of an article on our latest issue Humanizing Healthc. Guarantee of the video I'm showing it now "Courageous Coaching at a Crossroads." This article is entitled Coaching Styles Revolution ~ Seven organizing forces behind great coaching LDavid Morelli. He's a PhD and, as I said, the co-founder and CEO of Owl Hub and brings 25 years. He's got a few on me of executive coaching and leadership development experience. David is the creator of the Respect Coaching Styles Framework. that's d , by the way, in assessments. Formerly David was a business school professor, in the I'm getting stuck on the piece today man in leadership with an instructor rating of 4.93 out of 5 from executive audiences. Well done. David also served as the SVP of strategy and talent development for a tech company, helping them grow 100 times in seven years I feel sorry for those employees to a 3.5 billion dollar valuation. Change, change, change. David himself is the host of a podcast and a number one podcast Owlcast. Conveniently, that's good, with over 1.2 million subscribers. He holds an executive MBA and PhD in business, with research in executive coaching and leadership from the University of Denver. Thank you so much for joining me today David. Great to see you again.

David Morelli :

Thank you, Garry. Yeah, I'm so excited to be here with you.

Garry Schleifer:

I remember we were just talking about how, when we first met back in the Midwest Regional Conference in what was it? Milwaukee, Milwaukee, yeah, Milwaukee. And then I saw you again at the recent Converge Spinning Your Wheel. Yes. So why don't you start by telling us a little bit about how you got to where you are today with this RESPECT and your research?

David Morelli :

Yeah, so I started off coaching back when people asked what is it?

Garry Schleifer:

Yeah, exactly.

David Morelli :

Yeah, absolutely, and today we don't really have to answer that as much. But when I said, oh, I coach executives, and they said, "well, what sports do executives play? Like no, no you don't understand. And so I feel like we've come a long way in coaching since those days we have truly, and so about 20 years into my coaching practice, I said you know what? I want to get a PhD? And I want to study leadership, business and coaching, and figure out what's going on inside of coaching and makes coaching so great. Because the research is very clear, right, coaching works, and there are plenty of evidence of that in our own experiences, but also in the research literature. But when I looked at how coaching works, there was more of a sparse population of people who said, well, a little bit of this and a little bit of that, and I was like, okay, well, there's a big gap there. And so I wanted to look at how do coaches such as ourselves and those who are listening, how do we get great results? What's the actual way we go about doing it? And that's where the RESPECT Coaching Styles came in. That was the result of studying some of the world's best coaches.

Garry Schleifer:

Wow, and when was that research done?

David Morelli :

Yeah. So that started about five and a half or so years ago and I looked at styles, because styles in leadership literature they're defined as the, if you will, the intention and behavior that couples together. So if you think about authentic leadership, servant leadership, et c. et c., a servant leader empowers their team and by doing so they give them challenging projects and like, let me make your decisions. So I said, well, okay, so, and that's true across how all styles are measured. I said, "Well, what are the intentions and behaviors of coaches and how do we kind of put those together in patterns that actually make sense? And so people started when I was interviewing them. I said," Well, what do you do? And they said, well, I hold people accountable. Okay, well, what's your intention behind doing it? And they said, well, I'm trying to get them to accomplish more. And so there were over over 2000 of those quotes that I pulled from the transcripts and coded them, and the distillation of that whole process was that there are seven styles that we use.

Garry Schleifer:

Wow, thank you. Where do you want to go first? Do you want to talk about the styles or do you want to talk about the styles that coach? You know what? I think I know. We need to know what these styles are and a brief summary of it. I know it's in the article, but for a listening audience, give us a rundown. R-E-S-P-E-C-T go.

David Morelli :

Okay, great. So the Rallier is all about helping people accomplish more. So if you think about it's helping them set goals or helping them get motivated for taking action or whatnot, it's the accountability that we were talking about before. Right, that quote was what became now known as the Rallier, and so it's all about point A to point B faster and more efficiently. So that's Rallier. The next one is Educator, and this one is about helping people reflect on their own learning, and it can be either learning that they gain from an article or from, perhaps, the coach themselves, or from their own lives and experiences, but it's taking knowledge and making it, I'll call it embodied capability, where they can apply that knowledge to really make more skilled you will actions or more insights. So that's the Educator. The Strategist is about helping people solve problems that they're facing, right. So if I said something like well, what problem are you running into, or what are the complexities that you're trying to hold, that would be more Strategists. The Provocateur is really all about challenging people's thinking and getting them to rethink how they're approaching their current situation, and so you could say something like well, what are some assumptions that you're making? That might not be true. The Explorer is next, which is more open, I'll call it expansion of thought and or reflection. So if I said to you well, Garry, what's really important to you? That would be an Explorer question. Or if I said, well, what would success look like here? Right, it's sort of this expansion. You don't have an agenda as to where it goes. You kind of let them wander into the woods all day. The Confidant is what I think a lot of people think about coaching. Where it's you're creating a safe space, you're creating openness where people can drop their walls and be their most authentic selves with you. You're deeply listening and empathizing and people can really open up. And that's one of the things that coaching, I think, is well known for. And then the final one, Transformer, is about helping people tap into that full potential that's within them, and sometimes that means that they're going to run into difficult emotions, so things like imposter syndrome or fear of failure or whatnot. And the transformer isn't just about listening to those that would be more confident, it's about helping them move through it in order to become their very best selves. And it's almost like there's energy locked in, stuck emotions, and when you can unlock that energy, people tend to feel like "Wow, I feel so much better now. Yeah, you've experienced that I can tell you oh yeah, big time. Yeah.

Garry Schleifer:

Yeah, so okay. So now it makes the question which one do you most resonate with or does your assessment tell you you use most often?

David Morelli :

You know it's interesting that has changed over time because as you become more aware of the and, by the way, all seven I think some people are saying but wait, I'm not just one of them, right, and that's.

Garry Schleifer:

Oh, yeah, we're that and so much more. I've always said that, yeah.

David Morelli :

Absolutely, but ideally, what we're doing is moving in and out of all seven styles and but I would say, in working with executives, one of the ones that I think people shy away from most, but that I've learned to lean into, is helping people solve the problems that they're facing, and not shying away from that. And the reason I say that is some people are like, " Well, you can't necessarily like, it's not about the problem, it's about the person," right, I agree, I think, fundamentally my DNA, I'm more of a transformer, right, like like that's. However, when people are facing that pressing problem that has them feeling boarded and they don't feel like they can move forward, they need to figure out a solution so that they can, in a way, free themselves up to you more of the work about themselves. And so I noticed that I leaned into that one quite a bit.

Garry Schleifer:

Well, it could- Transformer, Explorer that much different?

David Morelli :

Yeah, so transformer has an agenda to them being their full selves right, and I know in coaching we're supposed to not have an agenda. However, right.

Garry Schleifer:

Well, no, we call it the little A agenda. Exactly right, they have the big A.

David Morelli :

Yes, exactly, that's from. Yep, you're speaking my language from back in the day, right?

Garry Schleifer:

Back of the day CTI.

David Morelli :

Yes, so. But if we see the potential in a person that you are trying to get them to move into their full selves and that's, if you will, the big A agenda, right with Explorer, you really are open that it could go anywhere. You're not saying there's a right value and I can see that right value in you. You're saying, well, what do you value in life? And so it's, in a way, it's a genderless in that it's helping them open or get out of their thought ruts and into a more creative, expansive space again about themselves or about the situations that they're in.

Garry Schleifer:

Yeah, you know, what's really popping up for me is the core competency of evoking awareness in this part of our conversation with Explorer. More than Transformer, now, I think right, but it sounds like both of them could be in that area, and I love that you framed it as most assessments should be framed, and that is, you don't box yourself in. But what's really great about what you're saying is that you can use these in different circumstances, which is maybe why the core competencies picked up. It's like, oh, I think our little A agenda, I think, when the client's ready to move here, or let's use this one. But OK, that being said, two questions. Oh, no, go ahead. What were you going to say?

David Morelli :

Well, I was going to say here's the thing that you mentioned the core competencies. So all seven styles are found in the core competencies. I went in and I coded to look at hey, do these show up or is this some different information? The problem with how the core competencies are written is there are 63 different lines about what the core competencies are, and some of them have to do with things like ethics, which aren't inherently stylistic or not, but how a coach goes about doing it. All seven are found in there, and so that gives a little bit of permission, I think, for people to use all seven styles and realize that that's coaching as defined by the International Coach Federation, if that's important to a coach?

Garry Schleifer:

Yeah, oh, great, great, great, great. Ok, so remembering we're not all one thing forever, but which way do coaches usually lean when you do your assessment?

David Morelli :

Yeah, yeah, great question. There are three styles that most coaches primarily lean into and in fact, out of all seven, there are three and most people they fall in these categories. In fact, when we were at the Converge Conference, the International Coach Federation Global Conference, these were the most picked buttons. So it's like both at the one style and as the multiple style is the Explorer, the Confidant and the Transformer.

Garry Schleifer:

Explorer. Right, we talked about that Confidant, which we all thought would be a pretty important one, and a Transformer Got it.

David Morelli :

Yeah, yeah, I would say people lean away from most often Educator and Strategist.

Garry Schleifer:

Well, because we're not there to educate, although I've heard in some coaching transcripts and conference recordings that there is an opportunity for that. But that's not the thing we head into.

David Morelli :

Yeah, yeah. Here's what's interesting, though. The CEO of the International Coach Federation, Magda MoOk I know we both know she said relatively recently that when coaching was starting, that we defined ourselves based on what we weren't, in order to gain an identity.

Garry Schleifer:

Right, so we're not a sports coach.

David Morelli :

Yeah well, actually early on it was ok. Coaching it's not therapy, mm-hmm.

Garry Schleifer:

Right, it's not consulting, not mentoring.

David Morelli :

Exactly, not training, right. And so early on we had, because we didn't have our own identity. We had to basically say here's what we aren't, to try and create some distinction, mm-hmm. But over time she said now we need to start borrowing from our closest neighbors who are doing similar work in order to round out the profession of coaching. And so when I was in my interviews, so, I interviewed a former coach at Google, a founder of one of the International Coach Federation Certified Schools, a best-selling author in coaching, somebody who coaches one of the executive teams of one of the world's top three universities, the guy who ran the Navy SEAL teams on the East Coast, who is a former command master chief and then moved into coaching and leadership. So a lot of great coaches and those who had traditional training kind of like, looked both ways and went actually what I do is. And then they would say things like.

Garry Schleifer:

Sometimes I give advice.

David Morelli :

Because they're looking for other options as to what they might do.

Garry Schleifer:

Exactly.

David Morelli :

Yeah, sometimes I say, hey, by the way, instead of me sending you an article after the call which is going to be disconnected from when we're actually having a conversation, I'm going to summarize the article here for you real quick. Here are the top three things that this article says to do in a difficult conversation. How does that apply here?

Garry Schleifer:

Exactly. Then back over to the client and you share, when you know that they can manage the discernment themselves of what works and what doesn't. Well, it might work.

David Morelli :

Yeah. So in a way, and people get I'll call it uncomfortable in this category right around Educator and Strategist and the reason is they don't want to take power away from the client, which I fully support and agree with them. However, to withhold information that may help them doesn't seem to necessarily align with the spirit of coaching, and so, in a way, as long as you make it about them and say " hey, based on my experience, here's some things that I've noticed that other people do, where does that take you? Right, sort of. As long as you put it back there, then you're in the spirit of coaching, right? If in the schedule you say you don't know what you're talking about. This is what you're talking about, end of story. That's not coaching, right? That's not coaching. That's very consultative, yeah exactly.

Garry Schleifer:

Well, to your point, I mean people. I always ask people why did you choose me as your coach? And one of the things is because of my experience. So who am I to hold back when I see it's appropriate, something that would be of service to them? To, at least usually in the brainstorming phase, right, like you, let them figure out a few things on their own. It's like, well, here's what I looked at to your point, here's what I learned about difficult conversations, or here's that article in a nutshell, or you know, and then tell me what you think. How does this fit into your needs? Back to coaching, right, yeah?

David Morelli :

Yeah, and you can say how does it, you can say how may it, right and depending on whether you wanna be direct or indirect about it. And so in that way we're providing, we're bringing our whole selves to the coaching dynamic and this is the discernment right. These styles aren't necessarily just while they do have language framings underneath each one, it's not just about, I'll call it the word choice you use. There's almost an embodiment of each of these styles right, where we want to bring, if you will, in the Educator we wanna bring that reflectiveness to really ponder, be thoughtful about things. The Strategist there's almost this commitment to coming up with a clear solution to a complex problem and the willingness to lean into that, right? Transformer is almost the embodiment of something else. So, again, like you're talking about, as long as we make it about them, we can bring our whole selves to coaching and service of them. And people have said these coaching styles have helped them almost release their own blocks to how they're showing up, because they felt like those two styles were off limits and I would say about half the coaches were traditionally trained in and all of them showed interview evidence of the Strategist and Educator. All of these people who had, on average, 18 years of coaching experience and 14 years coaching executive specifically. So early on, it was a hedge to try to not have people come in and just say, hey, go do this, because I know this and you don't know anything. t was a hedge, but don't take it off the table forever.

Garry Schleifer:

Well, and to go backwards, coaching works in conjunction with those kinds of efforts. I remember early days of my coaching training like research 20 some odd years ago. I remember seeing an article and it said that learning stays that 80% longer if you add coaching, and I wouldn't doubt that that's still the case. Hthey remember that when we didn't really know what coaching was. A different question. This one's for me personally. So I run a business and I am a coach, but I have different styles. Have you found that people have different styles as a leader versus c a ?

David Morelli :

That's a fantastic question. I find that people tend towards some of the same areas. However, when people say I'm gonna put on my coaching hat, it's almost that marker of I'm going to shift into being different, and so ideally, we're showing up in ways that are needed in a moment by whomever we're speaking with. Sometimes that's somebody that's a client and you don't have that I'll call it hierarchical relationship, and so there are gonna be different things that are appropriate there. But as a leader, you might say, well, you might be a little bit more direct or you might be a little bit more sitting on the line. Or yeah, exactly right, and so it's just being conscious of how we're moving. that until we have this framework to understand the different styles or patterns within the ways that we move, we haven't known how to describe and flex and become conscious of the things that we're doing, right, and so the business will and may need something different from you, as in terms of how you express these styles from a leadership perspective versus necessarily a coaching client.

Garry Schleifer:

Yeah, yeah, good observation, thank you, good reminder. So coaches, using your tool, how do they expand their use styles? Like you said, they're not just one and we've already inferred that different situations can ask for different styles. But any other guiding advice for our listeners and readers?

David Morelli :

Yeah, yeah. So on the website we have a one question or basically like one minute quiz where you can go through and figure out your top one, but I think there's, as you learn, a little bit more about them. There's blogs on our website and things. Clearly, there's the article as well, which hopefully they all have the magazine and are listening to this as a supplement to that, but I would say there are language patterns underneath each one. The thing that makes styles great is that it isn't about personality. It's more about embodied behavior right, so you can learn to ask more of the questions that you lean away from. But it's really hard to do that until you know your starting point, and so I think the first step I would say is to go take this, reflect on it and then learn a little bit more about the styles and how they express, but then practice stretching yourself. What I do is I tend to put like far yes to ECT on how you use an iPad to take this, and I put little check marks next to which styles I'm using.

Garry Schleifer:

Right, good idea Over time.

David Morelli :

Yeah, over time you realize. Oh wait a second. I'm leaning into this style more than others. I will say early on people get a little confused as to which styles they are. But we'd go over that in training or in debriefs.

Garry Schleifer:

Well, okay, now we have to watch our language, because what we're saying is they aren't a style.

David Morelli :

Which styles they have tendencies to use. But each, behind some of the, you know the seven forces behind. We, every question, every statement has a style behind it. Sometimes you can actually combine styles as well. So if you said, what's your goal for solving this problem? Right, you're actually combining Rallier and the first part, and Strategist in the second. And so if we understand what we're doing and how we weave in and out of these because each question, your statement, has a style what we discover is that we can become more skill, more capable, more dynamic for others. So, but the starting point is figuring out well, where am I starting with what? What are my styles? To begin with, frequency is life.

Garry Schleifer:

And then to me, what for myself? I also heard observation like play with the, put our RESP ECT down beside it, keep the article there and just have fun framing your coaching for the day. And then I guess another one would be to specifically say, okay, I'm going to do my best because it's not our agenda to fit in T today, right, to do more T work, because I don't usually do it that kind of thing. It's similar to training for, you know, for your coaching certification. Really, it's like what are you noticing, what would you want more of? And then what happens to have to show in a recording when you submit it to the International Coaching Federation? Other than that?

David Morelli :

Well, well said, I appreciate that caveat. I'm glad you passed that exam. Because I worked with master survey coaches and those who have coaching schools and all that. They said, yeah, when you're going for certification, probably lean into Explorer competent Transformer.

Garry Schleifer:

Yeah, a little bit of Rallier, but you know they would lean away from the others for that particular aspect of your for that particular yeah, and yeah, you know it's.

David Morelli :

People are looking for certain things and while this is a revolution, the coaching styles will change, how we fundamentally describe coaching. It's going to take a little while, so until that sort of trickles all the way through the coaching world, I would say lean into, Explorer, Confidant, and Transformer for that purpose.

Garry Schleifer:

Cool, Awesome. What's in your future? What other studies have you done with the Respect? What else you're up to?

David Morelli :

Yeah, we've done a couple studies with this, particularly as it relates to organizations, and so one found that we had 234 US full-time workers, and when I asked them through the survey, hey, when you quit your job, why did you quit? And lack of motivation was one. Did you feel like you weren't getting help with developing your skills? Meaning you were feeling like you didn't have enough of that. You didn't have enough help solving problems that you were facing, etc, etc. Those, by the way, were all coded, the styles, and so 90% of people strongly agreed that they quit because one or more of those fundamental needs the styles fulfill we're missing. Only 65% of them said it also had to do with money, but when people say why they quit, they cite money as the top reason, but it's not. This evidence suggests that it's actually coaching and that leaders becoming great coaches is what's needed. In fact, 3.7 styles were missing on average, but 30% of people quit because they had two or fewer styles that were missing. So that was one. And then the other one was this question that says well, can anyone become a coach? And what happens when we introduce coaching to the whole organization to teach them how to coach, and so I had a couple of the people who graduated from the Train-to-Trainer program that we have, and they were like the head of people as well as an internal coach. They rolled it out to a group of 200 employees and in three months, job satisfaction jumped 180%.

Garry Schleifer:

Wow, that's amazing.

David Morelli :

And Garry, I got to tell you when they said, "Hey, we're going to roll this out and try and make everybody into a coach in the organization"

Garry Schleifer:

Of course now. Yeah, Now I'm like what a great idea.

David Morelli :

And I was like I don't know. I think what we should do instead is give everybody. So there's an assessment for the coach, but there's also a mirrored assessment to say, how does your coachee want to be coached by you? And that's been, by the way, transformative for my own coaching as well as those who are using that tool, because it lets you know what they consider to be the value of coaching. Right, and it's not that you can't use style variety, it's just knowing that rapport is built on the meeting of expectations, especially early, and so, anyways, that's been incredible, but I thought you should roll that out to everybody and they were like no, no, no, we're going to make everybody a coach. Yeah, your funeral.

Garry Schleifer:

Everybody, coaching everybody, instead of getting the job done.

David Morelli :

Yeah, right, but what happened was we went in there and we actually had a two day filming afterwards because they said, hey, our job satisfaction, you know, jumped. Would you like to come talk to people and find out what happened? Yes, so we kept hearing not only am I getting like I'm giving coaching to other people, I'm getting coaching from them, but I'm becoming a better parent, a better spouse and better community member and I think we all know this as coaches. But they started to say, oh, I realized that was a moment that I needed to be a Provocateur to you know whomever, right, my son, or? Oh, I realized that was actually a Confidant moment. Don't go strategist on them, don't try and solve the problem, listen, right. And so they could have language for this, which transformed their culture and is has really created a huge impact. The CEO said the single best thing that he's done is introduce a coaching culture through respect, and then they can come into the organization.

Garry Schleifer:

So wow, congratulations, by the way, that's amazing I know you're up to tons of stuff, but great work.

David Morelli :

Thank you, I appreciate that. The best part for me, can didly, w as I trained the people who then went and implemented it and I didn't have anything to do with it. That was like right, I don't want it to. You know what I mean? Like yeah, I think it's about if it empowers other people to become their best selves. It's a toolset that allows that to happen. I just kind of feel like I was in the line of this unfolding kind of happening through me, where I research to distill it, but it's, it's almost like it ideally the wisdom of how we go about great coaching anyways, it just now gives us a framework.

Garry Schleifer:

I hope you're going to write for us again. It sounds like you have some other things to say about, like I think our listeners will want to know and our readers will want to know about these, the impact of these things as well, and then how to change the use. But in the meantime, what would you like our audience to do as a result of this, the article and this conversation?

David Morelli :

Yeah, I think there's an assessment.

Garry Schleifer:

You might want them to go do.

David Morelli :

Yeah, sure. So at Owl hub. com Owl like the flying owl, like yeah hub like where yeah, the, it's where great leaders and coaches come together. You know wisely.

Garry Schleifer:

Yeah, that's leaving that, yeah, wisely.

David Morelli :

Yeah. So Owl hub. com, right on the front page, is an opportunity to take the one question quiz the one-minute quiz, where the goes into it's actually a tiebreaker question and our full 42 question assessment. That's probably the easiest place to go there's. If you want, you can do the full assessment that's available there as well. But a lot of people who are in the coaching community say I can feel the transformational power of this, I'd like to get trained, and so there's training on there as well. Yeah, train the trainer and coaching.

Garry Schleifer:

Interesting. Yeah as well. Yeah, yeah, oh no, that's up c oaches alley making a difference, higher power. You said all the right words. David.

David Morelli :

Yeah, I you know, if I step back and think about it, coaching has the ability to, and I think we all know this, but to transform not only individuals lives, but as we move out and create a ripple in the world and give people the tools to help them coach, I believe that we can really move society that's somewhat disjointed and bring broken. Let's not fly to ourselves right like right, we all know it and feel it, but to move in such a way that brings out each person's unique gifts. And and to me, that's what this whole journey is about, and that's why I guess I'm so passionate about this is like I feel.

Garry Schleifer:

You're passionate about this, I could hardly tell. If he jumps through the microphone every time he hits a topic. Provocateur much yeah yeah. Maybe that's fine, but I have I'm not in so much more which I can't say no. Thank you so much. I'm guessing the best way to reach you is Owlhub. com. David, thank you so much for joining us today for this Beyond the Page episode. I would love to have more time to talk to you, but, as I said, and as I said, well, just right for us, then we'll have you back on again.

David Morelli :

Yeah, let's do it. Let's do it.

Garry Schleifer:

Loving the research, loving the connection, and the fact that what you contributed to the coaching profession allows us to say who we are and not who we're not. So thank you for that. That's all. Remember that one for a while.

David Morelli :

That's it absolute honor being here. Thank you for having me.

Garry Schleifer:

No, my pleasure. That's it for this episode of Beyond the Page. For more episodes, subscribe to your favorite podcast app. If you're not a subscriber, you can sign up for your free digital issue of choice Magazine by going to choice- online. com and clicking the sign up now button. I'm Garry Schleifer. Enjoy the journey of mastery.

Exploring Coaching Styles With David Morelle
Coaching Styles and the Coach's Role
Coaching Styles and Their Impact